Enterprise Nation has announced the first of 12 Enterprise Champions who will be representing our community across the UK and helping us to grow a truly entrepreneurial nation. 

We're profiling each of the Champions and next up is Daisy White, who represents Horsham in West Sussex.

Who are you and what do you do?

I'm Daisy White and I am an author, and pop up shop and event consultant. I also run my own award-wining pop up business, Daisy White's Booktique. Having run various pop up events, including a very successful Pop Up Gatwick, I am currently working with my local council on Pop Up Horsham, a 12 month affordable shop share designed to give entrepreneurs a chance to dip a toe in high street trading. 

Tell us about the small business scene in your region. Why is it so good?

There are numerous award-winning, thriving small businesses in and around Horsham & District and eight business groups meeting on a monthly basis in the town. The semi-rural area means that start-ups are often challenged by lack of internet access and travel expenses but it does produce some exceptional small businesses.

What needs to be done to make it even better?

Business rates are a huge challenge in the area, and preventing our micro companies from adding a physical platform to their already thriving internet and kitchen table business plans. Just as an example, I have three fast-growing food-based companies who are keen to move into short term leases on the high street, but are currently prevented by unrealistic rents and rates. This is where pop-ups are so important, not just for cities and global opportunities, but for local people on local high streets.

I was very disappointed by the Budget, which certainly did not deliver on various business rate and land tax related issues. Sunday trading is a tiny step and more likely to benefit out-of-town garden centres.

Tell us about two great small businesses in your region and why they're so brilliant.

Cocoa Loco: Chocolate genius Sarah Payne and her husband Roy have built from the ground up and now supply Abel and Cole, have a cluster of awards, and made a move onto the high street last year.

The Aviation Historian: The 'over 50' (no, he doesn't mind me saying this!) start-up is the baby of former journalist Mick Oakey. After two years the company is now selling globally, and Mick is a marketing genius and regular on The History channel.

Why were you happy to become an Enterprise Nation Regional Champion?

I am thrilled to become a Champion, as by sharing facts and joining forces we become a stronger voice for all the entrepreneurs who struggle to be heard. I also love the fact Enterprise Nation is actually doing something positive to help and grow, rather than just talking about it down the pub or boardroom (delete as appropriate). The organisation provides amazing opportunities and education for entrepreneurs on an affordable, friendly basis.

What are your three top tips for running a successful business?

  • Be flexible
  • Be prepared to learn as you go and employ people who are really excellent in the key areas you may be weaker in (finance being one of these)
  • Finance again - don't overstretch, especially as you hit year two!

Previous Enterprise Champion profiles:
Debbie Assinder, West Midlands
Fay Easton, Telford and Shropshire
Alison Edgar, South West
Quentin Pain, East Anglia

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